Jack Wilshere is currently searching for a new club after having his West Ham United contract terminated by mutual consent.

It’s quite the fall from grace for a 28-year-old tipped to the future of the England national team. After making his Arsenal debut aged 16, Wilshere earned the first of his 34 international caps just two years later.

Yet injuries have marred his career to date, with the past five seasons all affected by fitness problems. It means that in what should be the peak of his prime, Wilshere is without a club.

But the midfielder is actively looking for one.

“It is important to find a club where I am going to play, be an important player and be happy. I don’t want to rush into anything. It has to be the right team in the right country,” Wilshere told BBC Sport.

“I am open to Europe or wherever.

“I am not naïve enough to think I am going to sign for a club and play straight away. There is a process to it. You have to train with the team, get to know your team-mates, maybe come off the bench a couple of times. I want to get that process going but it has to be the right thing.”

Should Sheffield United try and sign Jack Wilshere?

West Ham United v Hull City - Carabao Cup Third Round

(Photo by Will Oliver – Pool/Getty Images)

The Blades are currently in poor form. They have taken just one point from their opening six Premier League matches. Fixtures with Manchester City and then Chelsea are upcoming.

They are the lowest scorers in the entire division and with the transfer window closed, can’t make any new signings until January. Unless they’re free agents – like Wilshere.

There is a reason the former Gunners star was so highly rated. On his day, few midfield players possessed as much assurance in possession, creativity and vision.

These are all things that United are arguably currently missing. Sander Berge did impress in a more advanced role against Liverpool on Saturday, but someone who can play a killer pass in and around the box could be the difference between staying up and not.

The cons to a potential deal for Wilshere are obvious. Could he stay fit?

History would suggest Wilshere wouldn’t come cheap, either. The Telegraph reports he earned £100,000-a-week during his time at West Ham.

That’s a lot for someone who isn’t playing. In fact, it’s way beyond the Blades’ reach, with their top earners on around £30,000-a-week.

But Wilshere wouldn’t be in the same bargaining position as he was when he joined the Hammers in 2018. The queue for his services clearly isn’t long.

However, if Wilshere is serious about rebuilding his reputation, he may accept a pay-per-play deal to remain in the top flight? It could suit all parties and provide United with a serious creative threat from midfield.

Have something to tell us about this article?